Skip to main content Skip to main navigation Skip to search Skip to footer

Thermal Design and Management of Servers

Thermal Design and Management of Servers

Abstract
In today’s digital age of rapid knowledge development, an enormous amount of information is being generated every day across the world. This data needs to be stored, processed and secured so the user can access this data quickly. Servers play a major role in this type of data-intensive business applications. The advancements in hardware, software and miniaturization technologies, along with the information evolution, has led to a vast increase in servers power densities and computing power. To improve the reliability and to enhance performance, thermal management needs to be performed in servers by removing the heat generated by the devices.

This paper focuses on the role of thermal management of servers in data centers and green data centers. It also investigates the challenges faced in thermal design and management of servers. The emerging cooling technologies which have evolved over the years in the server industry will be discussed. Case studies on thermal management of servers will be presented.

Excerpts from the Paper
Any computer or device providing services can technically be called a server. In the hardware sense, server means a computer model intended for running software applications under the heavy demand of a network environment. With the evolution of the internet, the amount of information exchange with the server is vast. In world wide web applications, servers are playing a major role in helping the data reach the user in fractions of seconds. A typical server consists of multi-core CPUs, DIMMs, hard drives, power supply units, network connections, etc.  
 
A data center is a collection of computer servers usually maintained by an enterprise to accomplish server needs far beyond the capability of one machine. These centers run enormously scaled software applications with millions of users. As data centers increasingly become the nerve centers of business and society, the demand for bigger and better ones increased. There is a growing need to produce the most computing power per square foot at the lowest possible cost in energy and resources, all of which is bringing a new level of attention and challenges. The growth in the number of servers and the Internet is driving toward more energy consumption. As servers become more powerful, more kilowatts are needed to run and cool them. As data centers grow to unprecedented scales, attention has shifted to making servers less energy intensive. Uptime’s Brill notes that while it once took 30 to 50 years for electricity costs to match the cost of the server itself, the electricity on a low-end server will now exceed the server cost itself in less than four years. The huge power draws have spurred innovation through computational fluid-dynamics modeling in the thermal management of servers, from the component level to rack level and to data center level.  

 

DOWNLOAD THE WHITEPAPER

Contact Us
MAX CHARACTERS: 10,000

We will treat any information you submit with us as confidential. Please read our privacy statement for additional information.

We will treat any information you submit with us as confidential. Please read our privacy statement for additional information.